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The death and resurrection of reason: On Kierkegaard's view of philosophy

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Title: The death and resurrection of reason: On Kierkegaard's view of philosophy
Author: Khushf, George Peter
Advisor: Nielson, Niels C.
Degree: Master of Arts thesis
Abstract: Kierkegaard identifies "philosophy" as the perspective which seeks to grasp Truth with thought. Thought is taken as a passion for ideality, immanence, and closure. But for Kierkegaard Truth involves reality transcendence, and openness. It thus transcends thought and can only be grasped by the whole person; i.e. Truth is known in "maximal subjectivity." Kierkegaard's affirmations about Truth rest on dogmatic assumptions. In contrast to the Socratic view, which takes Truth as immanent and attainable by way of remembrance, Kierkegaard views Truth as "coming" in a significant Moment called "the fullness of time." To the unregenerated self this Truth will appear as a paradox. If the self affirms itself, then the paradox is taken as "offence." But if the self gives up itself and embraces the paradox in faith, then there is a resurrection of reason such that the paradox is no longer contradiction.
Citation: Khushf, George Peter. (1990) "The death and resurrection of reason: On Kierkegaard's view of philosophy." Masters Thesis, Rice University. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/17027.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/17027
Date: 1990

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